Tag Archives: GoGreen ’11 Portland

GoGreen ’11 Portland Green Line Series: Intel’s Lorie Wigle on Empowering People To Make Sustainable Choices

Intel’s General Manager for Eco-Technology and GoGreen ’11 Portland Keynote Speaker, Lorie Wigle, has her eye fixed on the business opportunities in sustainability. Using Intel technology, she and her team are tackling our biggest environmental problems by increasing efficiency, driving systemic integration and empowering people with the tools to make smarter choices about their energy and resource consumption.

GoGreen Conference: Tell us about the connections between Intel’s penchant for chasing invention, ingenuity and discovery as a technology company, and sustainability. How does a greener mindset fit into that picture?

Lorie Wigle: It’s interesting because that question causes us to ask: What does sustainability mean? There’s a writer and proprietor at Greenbiz.com, Joel Makower, who has formed a framework to describe it in the context of business. His theory is that companies go through three stages of evolution in sustainability.

The first one is to do no harm. For Intel that’s very germane to the way we run our factories. Our factories use energy and water. If we want to do no harm, we have to figure out how to minimize our impact. Intel has actually been reporting our environmental footprint since 1994. We make goals well in advance of necessity and we look closely at our environmental footprint in order to ensure we’re meeting them across the board.

The second stage, as Joel puts it, is to do well by doing good. A great example of that at Intel is how we look at our microprocessors. Microprocessors are used in servers, data centers and the notebook computers and smartphones we all carry around with us. Energy efficiency has become a prime basis for competition with the microprocessor—so the more energy efficient we make our products, the better we do in the marketplace and by the environment.

We did an analysis for our CEO recently, looking at the overall energy consumption of the first one billion connected PCs. There were approximately one billion connected PCs in 2007 and together they consumed about 320 terawatt hours of energy per year. Now, we’re forecasting there will be two billion connected PCs globally by the end of 2014—but the amazing thing is that those two billion PCs will use half the energy that the first billion used, and they’ll do seventeen times as much work. The reason for that is that we’ve been able to capitalize on Moore’s Law—which is the doubling of transistors every 18 to 24 months—to drive better energy efficiency and form factors. Through things like this, we do well by doing good.

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GoGreen ’11 Portland Green Line Series: Rep. Jules Bailey on Sustainability as a Business—Not a Partisan—Issue

Oregon State House Representative, Jules Bailey (District 42)Oregon State House Representative Jules Bailey is quite certain sustainability is not so much a partisan issue as it is a business one. He’s got proof too. The state legislature he serves on—split evenly down the middle between Democratic and Republican representatives—has continually worked together to pass laws that help Oregon businesses and residents tap into incentives and protect the resources our economy relies on. These are seen as pro-business choices in addition to pro-environment choices. In this Green Line Series interview, Rep. Bailey tells us how Oregon is moving sustainability beyond partisan politics and how businesses in the state stand to benefit.

GoGreen Conference: Oregon is a pretty progressive state when it comes to environmental and social considerations. We’d like to know how you think business can best partner with the state legislature and representatives in government to continue the support for sustainability that we enjoy here?
Jules Bailey: One of the real advantages we have here in Oregon is that sustainability, especially as it relates to clean energy, has become a bi-partisan issue in our state. I think that’s evidence of a legacy of interest we’ve had in sustainability over the course of Oregon’s history and the leadership efforts we’ve made that are now nationally and internationally recognized.

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